Monday, April 3, 2017

President Trump’s Listening Session on Healthcare



Remarks by President Trump in a Listening Session on Healthcare
The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release
March 13, 2017


Roosevelt Room
11:27 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you all for being here today.  It’s a great honor for you to share your personal stories of struggle under the enormous strain imposed on you by the very, very failed and failing Obamacare law.  Secretary Price and I, along with my entire administration, and a lot of people in the Senate and a lot of people in the House are committed to repealing and replacing this disastrous law with a healthcare plan that lowers cost, expands choice, and ensures access for everyone. 

You represent the millions of Americans who have seen their Obamacare premiums increase by double digits and even triple digits.  In Arizona, the rates were over 116 percent last year -- 116 percent increase.  And the deductibles are so high you don’t even get to use it.

Many Americans lost their plans and doctors altogether, and one-third of the counties -- think of it, one-third only have one insurer left.  The insurance companies are fleeing.  They’re gone; so many gone.  The House bill to repeal and replace Obamacare will provide you and your fellow citizens with more choices -- far more choices at lower cost.  Americans should pick the plan they want.  Now they’ll be able to pick the plan they want, they’ll be able to pick the doctor they want.  They’ll be able to do a lot of things that the other plan was supposed to give and it never gave.  You don’t pick your doctor, you don’t pick your plan -- you remember that one.

We’re not going to have one-size-fits-all.  Instead, we’re going to be working to unleash the power of the private marketplace to let insurers come in and compete for your business.  And you’ll see rates go down, down, down, and you’ll see plans go up, up, up.  You’ll have a lot of choices. Read more

 Healthcare - Justice Network link



The business case for single payer
Fix It Healthcare.com

Business owner Richard Master knows firsthand how the dysfunctional U.S. health care system punishes not only patients, but also employers who are forced to spend more and more to insure their workers. His documentary, "Fix It," makes a strong business case for addressing this festering problem, and includes interviews with many PNHP members. A trailer for the film can be accessed above, or you can view the full version for free by visiting the "Fix It" website. Read more

Fix It Healthcare - Get Active HERE!
Fix It Healthcare - Watch the Movie
Fix It Healthcare brochure booklet PDF
Fix It Healthcare tri fold brochure PDF



Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) is a non-profit research and education organization of 20,000 physicians, medical students and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance. PNHP reports Analysis of HR 676: Medicare for All would save billions, Physicians for a National Health Program, by Gerald Friedman, Ph.D.

Expanded & Improved Medicare for All Act
Introduced in House (01/24/2017)
Sponsor: Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D)



Taylor Swift - Shake It Off Live - Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Wikipedia link. The Lady Cilento Children's Hospital (LCCH) is the major specialist children's hospital for Queensland and New South Wales, Australia families. Official website
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On Health Care, We’ll Have What Congress Is Having

The New Yorker
By Jeffrey Frank 
January 17, 2017


In the fall of 1994, the Clinton Administration’s much debated comprehensive, and complicated, health-insurance bill—known derisively as Hillarycare—died quietly on Capitol Hill. It was a moment that, the Princeton sociologist Paul Starr later argued, would "go down as one of the great lost political opportunities in American history." But, before the end, talk of another approach kept bubbling up: to allow those Americans who couldn’t get insurance elsewhere to buy a policy that was just as good, and inexpensive, as what members of Congress got. When Senator Edward M. Kennedy, of Massachusetts, said that Americans should get "exactly what we have," he meant the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.

The F.E.H.B.P., as it’s known, was started in 1959, a few years before Medicare, and was meant to cover some nine million government employees—civil-service workers, the courts, the Post Office, members of Congress, and more. It wasn’t a single plan but, rather, as a Times story put it, "a supermarket offering 300 private health plans." (Even the right-learning Heritage Foundation called it "a showcase of consumer choice and free-market competition.") One may get a sense of its scope and inclusiveness—its supermarket-ness—in the way that the Office of Personnel Management, which administers the program, explains it to federal employees. Much of the program—for instance, the idea that no one can be refused, or charged more, for a preëxisting condition, or that dependents under twenty-six are covered—will sound familiar to anyone conversant with the most attractive parts of the Affordable Care Act. Read more




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